Alternative Pain Management

When we think of pain management, most people think of doctors or a pain management clinic. These are great sources of pain management but there are countless other ways to manage pain.
Pain Management is actually a medical approach that draws on disciplines in science and alternative healing to study the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of pain.
Many forms of alternative medicine treat beyond the physical sensation of pain. They release negative energy, stress, and tension and allow the body to naturally reduce pain.

Some forms of alternative medicine include:

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy uses the essential oils of plants to provide pain relief. It is only natural that aromatherapy would decrease pain. Every movement (voluntary and involuntary), sensation (pain), smell, taste, etc. originate in the brain. Smelling essential oils effectively change your perception of pain. Essential oils are even effective at treating pain when applied topically.

Massage therapy

Massage therapy is the manipulation of muscles, connective tissue, tendons and ligaments. This manipulation promotes health and well-being by assisting the body’s ability to release toxins stored in muscles. It has many applications and techniques. Massage therapy uses include cancer patients, pregnancy and chronic pain suffers. Massage also is relaxing and reduces stress.

Woman in a day spa getting a deep tissue massage therapy

Acupuncture ‘

Studies confirm that acupuncture is effective in treating pain. This method of alternative pain management existed for at least 2,000. It is of Chinese origin and involves the insertion of tiny needles into the skin. It is beneficial for back and neck pain, knee pain and headaches.

Chiropractic care

Chiropractic care uses non-surgical techniques and manipulations to reduce chronic pain. Chiropractic care makes adjustments in the spine through a variety of techniques. Correcting the body’s alignment is thought to relieve pain and improve function. This helps the body to heal itself. It is used for back pain, headaches, asthma, neck pain, and whiplash.

Yoga

Yoga uses controlled breathing, meditation and movement to stretch and strengthen muscles. Yoga use for pain is quite popular. People with arthritis, fibromyalgia, migraines, lower back pain, etc. use yoga. A weekly class typically increases mobility, improves mood and promotes psychological well-being.

Young woman practicing yoga in the park.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi improves balance, coordination, flexibility, strength and stamina. It is a mind-body exercise that uses slow-motion, controlled breathing, meditation and movement to strengthen and stretch tight muscles. Tai Chi is thought to reduce stress and anxiety which help relieve pain.
Hypnotherapy – uses relaxation techniques to alter your awareness. This approach decreases pain by first reducing the anxiety that pain causes.

Reiki

Reiki is of Japanese origin. It is made of two the Japanese word Rei which means “the wisdom of God or Higher Power” and Ki which means “life force energy”. This form of alternative medicine was developed in 1922. It is practiced in varying cultures across the world. This technique aids the body in releasing stress and tension by creating deep relaxation. Reiki is thought to promote healing and overall health.

There are many forms of alternative pain management. Some forms work better for some people than others. The key is to keep searching until you find one that works for you. It is not a one size fits all. However, I used many forms for pain management prior to bi-lateral knee replacement. In fact I enjoyed them so much that I continue to use aromatherapy, chiropractic care, yoga, and massage therapy as part of my self-care routine. Taking care of our physical, mental and spiritual needs are a top priority.
Many of these practices reduce stress and anxiety. Ongoing arthritis pain is a tremendous burden which creates stress in all areas of your life. Reducing stress reduces physical, emotional and psychological pain. Using alternative pain management offers many benefits that extend far beyond the physical.

Live Joyfully
Kimberly

Kimberly is a life coach and author who specializes in working with people with chronic pain or chronic illness.
Want the support of a life coach that understands chronic pain visit.
http://joyfullivingwithkimberlydixon.com/.
Ask about my post-TRK support calls!

Are you a senior wanting to learn how to become more active? Follow https://seniorwhoexercisesislit.wordpress.com/blog/.

Joyful Living

Joyful Living

For more information on arthritis, preparing for total knee replacement and what to expect after TKR check out my books. Available at http://goo.gl/QaqFF6

I Have Arthritis, Now What? (Ways to Manage Arthritis Pain)

I Have Arthritis, Now What? (Ways to Manage Arthritis Pain)

I Need a Knee Replacement, Now What? (How to Prepare for Knee Replacement Surgery)

I Need a Knee Replacement, Now What? (How to Prepare for Knee Replacement Surgery)

I Had a Knee Replacement, Now What? (What to Expect After Knee Replacement Surgery)

I Had a Knee Replacement, Now What? (What to Expect After Knee Replacement Surgery)

I Had a Knee Replacement, Now What? (Six Week Companion Journal)

I Had a Knee Replacement, Now What? (Six Week Companion Journal)

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Categories : Well-being